Future Ready Teacher


QAI’s Innovative Pedagogies Readiness Index (FR301)


The Open University, UK’s Third Innovation Report (http://www.open.ac.uk/iet/main/sites/www.open.ac.uk.iet.main/files/files/ecms/web-content/Innovating_Pedagogy_2014.pdf) explores new forms of teaching, learning and assessment for an interactive world, to guide teachers and policy makers in productive innovation. This third report proposes ten innovations that are already in currency but have not yet had a profound influence on education. To produce it, a group of academics at the Institute of Educational Technology in The Open University proposed a long list of new educational terms, theories, and practices. These were reduced to ten that have the potential to provoke major shifts in educational practice, particularly in post-school education. Lastly, the report drew on published and unpublished writings to compile the ten sketches of new pedagogies that might transform education. The innovative pedagogies include; Massive Open Social Learning, Learning Design Informed by Analytics, Flipped Classroom, Bring your own Devices, Learning to Learn, Dynamic Assessment, Event-based Learning, Learning through Storytelling, Threshold Concepts, Bricolage.


QAI, UK’s research and surveys show that in order for a teacher to be a Future Ready teacher, they need to possess the knowledge required and equally important to adopt the knowledge and learning and implement it in their teaching-learning process. Accordingly, QAI has developed a set of 5 Readiness Indices for teachers covering Innovative Pedagogies, Flipped teaching, ICT integration, CLIL teaching and English teaching (suitable for English subject teachers only).


This Innovative Pedagogies Readiness Index is one of the 5 self-assessing questionnaires for teachers that together will provide an overall picture of a teacher’s future readiness on the QAI Future Ready Framework. It contains about 25 self-assessing questionnaire that teachers of all subjects and all grades are expected to complete. The result will be a snapshot that will guide teachers to develop a Continuous Professional Development (CPD) plan for themselves and will also serve as an input for the School Management to receive a data driven input on the areas where professional development needs to be organised and the areas where the teachers are doing well.


This questionnaire is classified into two sections. One links to ‘Knowledge and Certification’ and the Second to ‘Adoption and Implementation’ of knowledge. QAI, UK believes that it is important to have the knowledge but more important to translate the knowledge into practice.



Knowledge & Certification

Knowledge of new and innovative teaching methods are very important for a teacher to be future ready and keep abreast with the latest in teaching and learning in general and in specific to the subject they are teaching.


Innovation in teaching is a change that creates new dimensions in the way the teachers develop their teaching strategies and help their learners to learn.


Educational institutions are faced with new challenges as they are increasingly discovering that the traditional methods of teaching are no longer effective and engaging, and that new approaches to the instruction process are needed.


The 21st Century teacher needs newer skills which call for a change in their own personality. They need to be more adaptive, flexible, creative, innovative and technology aware, with the objective of enhancing learner engagement. This alone would bring about the necessary change where the teacher is seen as the ‘guide on the side’, rather than as a ‘sage on the stage’.


The innovative teaching approaches that are required to be developed by teachers are expected to include student-centred pedagogy, ability to extend learning beyond the classroom, using ICT (information and communication) tools for teaching and learning, leveraging the vast information available on the internet by becoming curators of learning resources and creators of study groups.


The teachers, who are guiding the 21st Century learners and helping them prepare for the Fourth Industrial Revolution, also require undergoing a shift in the way they design their teaching methodologies and teaching-learning activities keeping in mind their learner engagement plans, assessment tools, feedback and remedial support mechanisms. The purpose of this shift should be to ‘fire-up the learner within’ and bring about greater learner independence.


All teachers must undergo some form of training/re-training on a continuous basis which will keep them up-to-date with the new and innovative pedagogies. While choosing a programme, teachers must ensure that the programmes that form part of their Continuous Professional Development (CPD) must include:

  • Elements of innovative teaching.
  • Developing innovative teaching methods.
  • Teaching innovatively with ICT.
  • Group work / activities.

and preferably conclude with some form of assessment / assignment that would lead to an international certification



Adoption & Implementation

Knowledge, Certification, Continuous upgradation of knowledge is important but equally important is its adoption, its implementation, measuring success and improving.


Teachers need to ensure that they are able to break through the barrier of the age-old standardised teaching methodologies and move towards implementing new and innovative teaching methods that will help learners remain engaged, involved and motivated and help in transforming the learners into self-directed, fired up learners.


While implementing the new and innovating teaching methods, teachers must be sure to include besides others:

  • Threshold concepts leading to mastery learning
  • Flipped teaching methods
  • Integrating English language in their subject teaching
  • Use of humour, role play, project-based learning etc. to increase participation and retain interest of the learners
  • Personalisation of learning
  • Use of ICT, Apps, Games to augment learning and revision

Teachers must design methods of assessing the progress and achievement of learners when implementing new teaching methods and ensuring that the implementation is moving in the right direction. We would like to share with readers here not to expect changes overnight. Changes are gradual and will take time, and may begin to show some results after two academic cycles of implementing and continuous improvements in the teaching methodologies.





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QAI’s Flipped Teaching Readiness Index (FR302)

Flipped Teaching method introduces a new instructional strategy and a type of blended learning that reverses the traditional educational arrangements by delivering instructional content, often online, outside of classroom. It moves activities, including those that may have traditionally been considered homework, into the classroom. In a flipped classroom, students watch online lectures, collaborate in online discussions, or carry out research at home and engage in concepts in the classroom with the guidance of the instructor (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flipped_classroom) . Research shows that introducing flipped teaching and learning brings in benefits for learners (http://www.flippedclassroomworkshop.com/results-studies-supporting-benefits-of-flipped-classroom/)


The Flipped Teaching Readiness Index is also one of the 5 self-assessing guide for teachers of all subjects and all grades. The objective of this questionnaire is to help teachers analyse their readiness in using Flipped Teaching in the classroom as part of the innovative teaching pedagogy. The outcome will also help the school plan necessary professional development programmes to upskill their teaching pool. This self-assessment questionnaire contains about 15 questions and is classified into 2 sections. One collects information about ‘Knowledge and Certification’ and the Second collects feedback on ‘Adoption and Implementation’ of knowledge as we believe that it is important to have the knowledge but more important is to translate the knowledge into practice, measure results and achieve success.



Knowledge & Certification

The 21st century has witnessed a major shift in the way students learn. Gone are the days when students would wake up in the morning and go to school, listen to what the teacher said (which used to be mainly reading of the text book), take notes, come back home and do homework in a mechanical manner.


Now-a-days, students have access to a host of information which is presented in an engaging manner through the internet, anytime … anywhere on their mobiles, tablets, laptops and now on wearable devices. This makes routine teaching in the classroom less appealing and makes the task of teachers more challenging. It is therefore important that teachers understand this challenge and begin to use new and innovative methods of interacting and engaging the students, outside the class and in the classroom.


Flipping the classroom provides one such method that interchanges lectures and activities. The flipped classroom is a new concept in education where the teaching model is reversed which means that students learn prior to coming to class and interact with the teacher in class with whole class activities. It completely changes the traditional teaching style into a new and innovative concept which helps improve the quality of learning, leading to greater depth and possibly mastery. It shifts from passive learning to active learning and has strategies which keep the students engaged and provides more time for the teachers to interact with the students.


Teachers share a set of well-designed resource materials that form learning capsules for the students who do initial reading and learning themselves, come to class ready for interactions, questions, discussions, doubt clearing and then complete activities and engage in collaborative work.


The 21st Century teacher must understand the benefits of the Flipped Teaching method, understand how to include and implement Flipped Teaching in their day-to-day teaching and support students. They must undergo professional training and re-training and must be part of on-going support networks.


While choosing a programme, teacher must ensure that the programmes that form part of their Continuous Professional Development (CPD) must include:

  • Flipped classroom as an innovative teaching model
  • Understand the myths and realities surrounding the flipped teaching methods
  • Plan for delivering mastery learning in a flipped classroom
  • Understand how best to utilise the time saved by implementing flipped teaching
  • See and understand from examples, how to include flipped teaching in their classrooms
  • Develop an actual flipped classroom that can be used to demonstrate implementation of the flipped teaching methods
  • Implement the flipped classroom
  • Engage in group work / activities

and preferably conclude with some form of assessment / assignment that would lead to an international certification



Adoption & Implementation

While Knowledge, Certification and Continuous upgradation of knowledge, is important, equally important is its adoption, its implementation, measuring success and improving.


To be able to measure success of a flipped classroom, teachers must implement the model in a planned manner and measure its success over time by collecting data and evidence which can be reviewed and must be taken into consideration when planning changes to the model.


It is also important that stakeholders, whether Parents, Students or the School, all are in sync with the understanding of implementing the flipped teaching methods and the advantages it will bring to the child and how it will help the child become self-directed, self-seeker and engaged learner.


Teachers will be required to travel the extra mile and break the barrier of the old school teaching methodology.


While implementing the new and innovating teaching methods, teachers must make sure to include besides others:

  • Organised reading activities with tasks in advance for students to prepare for the class
  • Use classroom time for maximising interactions, discussions and associated teaching
  • Introduce the concept to students to create learning journals and use of the KWL (Know, Want to know and Learned) approach
  • Increase group work and collaborative learning
  • Develop learning communities and use of social media and groups for teaching and learning
  • Creating and using teacher created videos, podcasts, revision bites etc.

Teachers must design methods of assessing the progress and achievement of learners when implementing the flipped teaching method and ensuring that the implementation is moving in the right direction. We would like to repeat that teachers, the school and other stakeholders must not assume overnight miraculous improvement. Improvement is a gradual process of change and will require some degree of un-learning and re-learning by all.





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QAI’s ICT Integration Readiness Index (FR303)

Traditionally, the role of a teacher has been that of one who transmits knowledge to the learners and the learners are the recipient of such knowledge transmitted by the teacher. However, the advent of technology has contributed to altering of the pedagogy. Teachers will be required to upgrade their existing skills and add new skills. One the key skills they will need to add to their personal portfolio will be ICT (Information and Communication Technology) Skills.


The QAI ICT Integration Readiness Index is a self-analysis guide aimed at teachers of all subjects to help them analyse their readiness in integrating ICT in the classroom and beyond in a holistic manner.


The ICT (Information and Communications Technology) Integration Readiness Index also forms part of the suite of 5 self-assessment measure for teachers of all subjects and all grades, to assess the level of ICT integration a teacher does in his / her class. This self-assessment guide is developed with the objective of providing a benchmark for teachers, trainers and their employers to analyse and assess their current level of understanding and familiarity with ICT tools and to develop plans for professional development and self-improvement.


This index is classified into 2 sections. One collects information about ‘Knowledge and Certification’ and the other collects inputs on ‘Adoption and Implementation’.


QAI, UK believes that it is important to have the knowledge but more important is to translate the knowledge into practice, measure success and course correct as needed.




Knowledge & Certification

ICT and learning has long entered the teaching-learning domain from Smart boards to online learning resources to Mobile apps and the journey continues with promise of more exciting developments going in the future including the introduction of Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) in the teaching-learning process.


At the recently held annual event of the World Economic Forum the talk has been about a technological revolution which is being termed the Fourth Industrial Revolution that is characterized by a fusion of technologies that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital and biological spheres.


We need to prepare our students to be ready for this Fourth Industrial Revolution which is going to impact during and beyond the 21st century.


The role of a teacher is the key in the development of a child and hence it is the teachers who need to be most equipped for the use of and managing the ever changing world of technology, software, mobile applications, wearable devices, AR/VR and a host of new things that we do not even know of are all going to come and the teachers need to be ready to face this challenge, upgrade and acquire skills and implement it in their teaching process.


There is an overload of information, material, resources available in the public domain quite in contract to earlier days when information was available with only a few. The teachers today do not need to worry about information, but need to work towards screening and curating appropriate and current learning resources for their students. Teachers do not need to worry about creating content, they need to worry about curating content. This too shows a complete shift in the way knowledge is acquired and imparted.


The role of the teacher is now higher order where a teacher has to not only pass the knowledge on but has to find newer ways of negotiating the available knowledge and to provide support to the students.


Teachers and the school as institutions need to understand that it is not about banning the use of Smart phones, Tablets, Laptops, Wearable devices, it is about integrating them as part of the teaching-learning process. This calls for a complete changeover in thinking and mind-set.


Integrating ICT in the classroom and outside is now a necessity rather than a choice. It has become the very basis of teaching.


The 21st Century teacher must therefore understand this fact and be prepared to face the challenge, conquer it and make technology their friend and let it work for them rather than treating it as a distraction.


Teachers must therefore, make themselves equipped with and keep up-to-date with the technological advancements taking place in their domain and how it can be integrated in the teaching-learning process. They must continuously develop and upgrade their ICT skills. They must include their students to help leverage technology under guidance and support from the teachers as the students will always be ahead of the curve as the students are ‘Digital natives’, whereas the teachers are ‘Digital migrants’.


However, as a start all teachers must undergo professional training and re-training and must be part of support and development networks. They must begin to use technology themselves for self-learning and upgrading.


However, while choosing a programme a teachers must ensure that the programmes that form part of their Continuous Professional Development (CPD) must include:

  • The basics of using technology and equipment and how to choose the best resources i.e. hardware and software.
  • Understanding this whole new world of mobile apps.
  • Being able to create groups for teaching and revision and using some easy and most common tools and apps for the same.
  • Being able to understand the curation process and how to become a good curator of resources.
  • Understanding some key tools that will allow easy creation of content by teachers including videos, audios etc..
  • How to keep oneself up-to-date using Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), Open Educational Resources (OERs) etc..
  • Using tools for creating, storing and sharing learning resources and collaborating with learners.
  • Video based support and revisions bites etc.
  • Improving learner performance using Learner Analytics.

The programme must end with some form of assessment / assignment that would lead to an international certification.



Adoption & Implementation.

We seem to repeat ourselves, but the fact is that unless knowledge and skills are put to practice and success measured, we will not be able to understand the real benefit or otherwise of integrating ICT in the teaching-learning process.


Teachers must begin integrating ICT and begin the use of technology for teaching and must make a small beginning. They must include the students or ‘Digital natives’ to help them in the mission of integrating technology while the teacher must continue providing top level guidance and expertise in the field of study.


Undoubtedly teachers will have to undergo a transformation and that too a daunting challenge. They will need to adopt things which traditionally may be seen as something that is not in their purview and something for the IT department of the institution to manage. This is no longer the case.


While integrating ICT in their classrooms, teachers must keep in mind some of the following points:

  • Curate and also Create your own learning resources and self-study capsules for students.
  • Think technology and more importantly think ‘Mobile’ and ‘Wearable devices’ as part of almost every activity.
  • Use ICT when introducing Flipped Teaching Methods and Innovative Teaching Methods.
  • Create groups on social media and messaging services.
  • Don’t get overburdened with technology. Sometimes technology can be addictive. Keep it easy and keep it simple. Draw the line at the right place..

Teachers must design their class room integrating technology into with their teaching. If leveraged right, technology can really benefit students in getting the best of resources anytime, anywhere and can help teachers in concentrating on supporting the student and enhancing their learning and developing them into uber-smart learners who are ready to seek information, ready to find solutions, ready to sieve through information and get the best possible education. All of which will help them prepare for the unknown and be successful in the 21st Century and beyond.





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QAI’s CLIL Teaching Readiness Index (FR304)

Content and language Integrated Learning (CLIL) describes the approach to teaching and learning where subjects are taught and studied through the medium of a non-native language. The experience of learning subjects through the medium of a non-native language is more challenging and intensive as there is greater exposure to the language and learners acquire knowledge and skills in different areas of the curriculum.


There are many advantages to the CLIL approach: it develops confident learners and enhances academic cognitive processes and communication skills. Students who see value and purpose in their learning, who are challenged to think actively and to ask their own questions, are going to be engaged in the lesson. Take those qualities away, and students become bored and disenchanted.


‘CLIL induces the learner to be more cognitively active during the learning process’, Van de Craen, P Mondt, K, Allain, L and Gao, Y (2008) Why and How CLIL Works


The CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning) Teaching Readiness Index also is part of the suite of 5 self-assessment measures for teachers to map them on the Future Ready Teacher Index. It assesses the readiness of a teacher in integrating English language into their classrooms when teaching a subject other than English, in an English medium environment. This self-assessment tool is developed with the objective of providing a benchmark for teachers, trainers and their employers to analyse and assess the current level of understanding and familiarity with CLIL method of teaching and to develop plans for professional development and self-improvement.


In this self-assessment guide there are 20 questions for all teachers. Then, there are additional 4 questions each for English Teachers and for Teachers of Other Subjects.


The questionnaire processes the outcome on 2 levels. One about ‘Knowledge and Certification’ and the Second on ‘Adoption and Implementation’. QAI strongly feels that practicing the knowledge acquired is key to success.



Knowledge & Certification.

We often witness that in an English medium teaching environment all subjects are taught in English medium, but there is no real integration of the language in the teaching or in other words teachers are not helping in developing the child’s language abilities in the context of the subject.


Thus students are unable to develop their subject specific language abilities which in turn affects their assessments and performance. Research indicates that low levels of English language acts as a barrier to academic attainment (http://pubs.sciepub.com/education/1/9/2/).


CLIL allows students to use their language skills in a meaningful and productive way, building fluency and confidence as they seek and discover knowledge.


CLIL helps improve learners’ performance in both curriculum subjects and the target language while making the content subject the primary focus of classroom materials. This helps provide cognitively challenging materials from the beginning.


CLIL teachers can be subject teachers or language teachers. Different teachers have different challenges: language teachers need to learn more about subject content; subject teachers need to learn about the language needed for their subjects. CLIL learners in schools are between 3 to 18 years old and start CLIL at different ages. They may be in vocational or academic study.


It is not the role of a subject teacher to teach English, but it is important for subject teachers, teaching in an English medium environment to understand that it is their responsibility to help students develop their English language abilities in the context of a subject.


It therefore becomes important for the teachers to ensure that they have developed their English language skills in their domain area and then integrate it into their teaching.


In order to support and help the learners develop English language skills it is important for teachers to gain and polish their knowledge about the CLIL approach and ‘demystify’ the concept of CLIL and to focus on specific areas of language development for classroom management and instructions and be ready to prepare students for the future.


It is recommended that teachers undergo some form of training in the area of CLIL approach to teaching. While choosing a programme, teachers must ensure that the programmes form part of their Continuous Professional Development (CPD) and must include:

  • Knowledge and Principles of CLIL.
  • Knowledge of Basic Interpersonal Communicative Skills (BICS).
  • Knowledge of Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP).
  • Knowledge of Language and communication skills across the curriculum.
  • Planning a CLIL lesson, including resources and material, language demands of subject.
  • Cognitive and learning skills across the curriculum.
  • Scaffolding content and language learning.
  • Methods to help students develop learning strategies.
  • Analysing CLIL based lessons.

The programme must end with some form of assessment / assignment that would include practical and hands-on activities, leading into an international certification



Adoption & Implementation.

Implementing a CLIL class is both important and at times taxing for subject teachers. It requires subject teachers to start looking at the English language side when developing their lesson plan, the activities, the assignments, the support to students.


The feedback to students is important and it must begin to include feedback on the language side which is not only to pointing out spelling errors but goes much beyond that. It is expected that a subject teacher, teaching in an English medium environment does possess above average overall English language abilities and very high level of subject specific vocabulary and its usage.


Undoubtedly teachers may be required to undergo a change and may be required to work on improving their overall English language skills and review their classroom management that will include both academic as well as non-academic communication and interactions with the learners.


While integrating CLIL in their classrooms, teachers must keep in mind the following:

  • Develop theme and project-based teaching methodology.
  • Collective development of cross-curricular lessons, projects and other content to support teaching-learning.
  • Adopt course syllabus to include language, content and learning skills outcome.
  • Developing proficiency in English language is not just the responsibility of the English teacher. It is the responsibility of all teachers.
  • Build a focus on English language development alongside subject knowledge teaching..
  • Consciously develop your lesson plans and explanations with a focus on subject specific vocabulary building and subject specific language usage.
  • Include the principles of BICS and CALP as part of subject teaching.
  • Seek help from English teachers to help and support the development of English language as part of subject teaching.




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QAI’s English Teaching Readiness Index (FR305)

The teaching of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) has expanded with the increasing use of English for Study, Teaching, Research, Further & Higher Education leading to use of English for work. The 21st Century teachers of English must use new, innovative and blended approach to teach English that will embed technology with established international standards, frameworks and benchmarks.


In the 21st century English is becoming the most ubiquitous the global language. It has become the language of science, technology, business, tourism, diplomacy, communication, presentation, social networking and more. Pervasive in many dimensions English has become a common denominator in all types of communication. is just everywhere. Teaching of English, therefore must be seen with the perspective of making students global citizens.


The English Teaching Readiness Index also forms part of the suite of 5 level self-assessment questionnaire for teachers of English language and allows them to self-assess their current understanding of teaching English as a foreign language and their awareness about the new methods, tools, practices which they may be using in their class. This English Teaching Readiness Index questionnaire is for English teachers only and is developed with the objective of providing a benchmark for them and the school to develop plans for professional development and self-improvement as necessary.


In this self-assessment guide there are 21 questions that are internally categorised to provide feedback to teachers on their ‘Knowledge and Certification’ and on ‘Adoption and Implementation’. Knowledge also needs to be implemented to demonstrate the teacher’s success with teaching.





Knowledge & Certification.

One of the fundamental changes that we have witnessed in the area of English language teaching has been the introduction of the Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) approach which emphasises the shift from the Teacher to the Learner as the centre of the learning environment.


The other is the recognition that the principles of teaching a second language to Learners and young learners in school, in specific are certainly different from that of teaching adults at the higher education level. Teachers and trainers need to keep that in focus when developing their knowledge and skills while planning language programmes and assessments.


The availability of information and search tools on the internet has eliminated the traditional asymmetry of knowledge access between the learner and the teacher. This has made it imperative for teachers to adopt innovative approaches towards creating the learning environment and curating resources appropriate for their learners. This equips them to meet the challenge of keeping young learners motivated, the class interactive and ensuring new learning is continuously happening.


English language teaching today needs to include a student-centred pedagogy, augmented learning beyond the classroom and use of ICT (Information and Communication Technology) tools for teaching and learning. Teachers and trainers need to be not just aware of but also be fluent users of the various tools available to them to be able to effectively deliver the highest quality learning.


It therefore becomes important for the teachers to ensure that they have developed their English language skills in their domain area and then integrate it with their teaching.


It is therefore expected that English teachers build and upgrade their skills through a journey of understanding the principles of teaching English as a second language in school, learning about the fundamentals of the CLT approach to teaching English to young learners, understanding the current bench-marks in English language proficiency, appreciating the need for innovative teaching methods and curating learning resources.


The programme must also focus on helping to understand the benefits of innovative teaching and work towards implementing these to meet the needs of the 21st century learners.


When deciding on a good continuous development programme, teachers must ensure that it covers:

  • International standards and benchmarks such as Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR), the Global Scale of English (GSE), the Cambridge Scale of English (CSE) etc..
  • Helps develop descriptors for your student’s based on the international frameworks.
  • Using ICT to augment teaching-learning.
  • Integrating English across other subjects when taught in an English medium environment.
  • Developing visual communication and other innovative teaching methods.
  • Personalisation of English language teaching.
  • Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS).
  • Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP).
  • Communicative English Teaching (CLT) approach.
  • Developing engaging lessons and concept revisions.
  • Developing new forms of assessments linked to the international frameworks that talk about modular enhancement of English language.
  • Curating and Creating high quality learning resources.

The programme must end with some form of assessment / assignment that would include practical and hands-on activities, leading into an international certification



Adoption & Implementation.

Having acquired the 21st century skills and international standards and benchmarks, it would be imperative for the teachers to transfer their knowledge and skills into reality by implementing the same as part of their teaching-learning process.


The teachers need to go beyond prescribed text books/course books and move to the next level by integrating new and innovative methods of developing English language skills of the students.


Subsequent to the implementation it would be necessary to measure success of these new and innovative teaching methods and plan further intervention.


In the 21st century, when implementing English language teaching, the teacher must keep in mind the following:

  • Use international tools and resources.
  • Include lots of Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening as part of the activities.
  • Contextualise English language teaching.
  • Aim at developing English language across subjects.
  • Be part of the Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) approach.
  • Build assessments linked to international standards and framework.
  • Develop personalisation to support the hesitant learners.




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